Words & Definitions

Need help with translating WW1, Inter-War or WW2 related documents or information?
Emerson Begolly
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Words & Definitions

Post by Emerson Begolly » 07 Apr 2003 18:50

I would like to know the English translations and definitions of the following words:

Landesorden
gottläubig
Julleuchter

Thanks,
Em.

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HPL2008
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Translation

Post by HPL2008 » 07 Apr 2003 20:31

Landesorden, roughly translated = State decorations. These were decorations of the former German Länder or States. (as opposed to the Third Reich-era's Reichsorden or national decorations) Example: Württemberg Bravery Medal or Bavarian Military Merit Cross.

gottgläubig = "god-believing". This was a euphemistic term the SS used in it's records to describe those of it's members who had left the church. (which the SS appreciated, encouraged, expected and - to varying degrees, sometimes with considerable pressure - demanded.) Since (vague) mythology played a rather significant part in the Nazi's ideology, the term "atheistic" was duly avoided.

Julleuchter = "Yule-lamp". The Nazis propagated to celebrate the ancient Germanic holiday of the Wintersonnenwende (= Winter Solstice) instead of the "Judeo-Christian" Christmas. Lighting the Julleuchter was part of the proscribed ritual for it's celebration. BTW: Himmler was rather fond of giving Julleuchters as gifts and thousands of these things were made by slave laborers in the concentration camps.

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Scott Smith
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Yule Lanterns

Post by Scott Smith » 08 Apr 2003 00:51

Julleuchtern were made in concentration camps and sold to bring income for the SS.
:)

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Karl da Kraut
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Post by Karl da Kraut » 08 Apr 2003 15:52

HPL2008's explanations are very good, but the term "gottgläubig" wasn't just used by the SS. From 1936-45 "gottläubig" was an official designation concerning the religious confession in personal particulars. It applied to people "that turned away from the acknowledged religious confessions, but aren't without fate" (my translation - (...) Personen, die sich von den anerkannten Glaubensgemeinschaften abgewandt haben, jedoch nicht glaubenslos sind. )

Before 1933 this term was actionally the self-designation of various "free-religious communities" not belonging to one of the major Christian denominations.[/i]

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HPL2008
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NSDAgnostics

Post by HPL2008 » 09 Apr 2003 22:26

Apologies - Karl is, of course, absolutely right! The word "gottgläubig" was introduced as an official designation by the Reichsinnenminister on 26 November 1936. Guess I'm so used to reading the word as a reference to SS personnel that it didn't even occur to me to check it's use beyond that organization.

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