Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

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Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by IrregularMedic » 26 Oct 2007 00:30

Wiki mentions this about the French I Corps:
At 0400 hours on June 17, 1944, the I Corps assaulted Elba in Operation Brassard. French forces comprised the 9th Colonial Infantry Division (9e DIC), two battalions of French commandos (Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc), a battalion and supplementary battery of the Colonial Artillery Regiment of Morocco (R.A.C.M.) and the 2nd Group of Morrocan Tabors (2e GTM), in addition to 48 men from "A" and "O" commandos of the Royal Navy. French Choc (lightly armed fighters who had the mission of operating behind enemy lines) units landed at multiple points before the main landing force and neutralized coastal artillery batteries.
Does anyone have information about the Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc? Where these troops were raised and how they were trained? Were they organized similar to a British Commando unit?

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Post by David Lehmann » 26 Oct 2007 07:36

Different French commandos in WW2:

The Bataillon d'assaut renamed Bataillon de Choc has been formed in May 1943 with many former "special agents". It was specialized in commando/airbone operations. It has been trained by the British SOE and the US ABTC.
On 11 September 1943, a company of the battalion is transported by the Casabianca submarine and lands on Corsica island.
On the 14th, the rest of the battalion lands in Corsica. A new company will be formed on the island with Corsicans.
After its liberation, Corsica will be used by the Bataillon de Choc for operations/raids against Italy, Elba island and as departure basis for Anvil/Dragoon in southern France.

On Elba island, the battalion is landing in an amphibious operations on June 17, 1944 They neutralize German batteries, defenses and the HQ at San Piero; enabling the landing of the 9e DIC and 2e GTM.

Metropolitan France:
On August 2, 1944 a platoon is parachuted on the Vercors. They group the partisans and organize ambushes. After 1 month of guerrila it takes part to the liberation of Valence.
On August 16, 16 men are parachuted in Provence before the Anvil/Dragoon landings (Muy and Saint-Raphaël areas) and harass the German troops.
The battalion is then engaged in Toulon, Aix-en-Provence, Saint-Etienne, Lyon etc. They enable the quick liberation of Dijon.
In November 1944, operations in the Vosges and liberation of Belfort.
Liberation of Masevaux and Hundsrück in Alsace.
In February the Bataillon de Choc is in Colmar, Durrenentzen and the Rhine is crossed at Germesheim.
They reach the Danube River at Sigmaringen and reach Arlberg on May 7, 1945.
Always as spearhead, the battalion had 170 KIA and 800 WIA.

------------------------------------

The Groupement de Commandos d'Afrique (GCA) has been formed in July 1943 after the Corps Franc d'Afrique has been disbanded.

Unlike the Bataillon de Choc, which was specialized in airborne operations, the GCA was specialized in
1. amphibious assaults
2. light motorised reconnaissance
3. actions behind ennemy lines
The GCA was not only light infantry unlike the Bataillon de Choc, since they had heav weapons and vehicles too. The GCA had a strength of about 1,200 men

Various operations:
Tunisia in 1943
Pianosa islands in 1944 (German garrisson defeated without a single French loss)
June 16-17, 1944 = seizure of Tombone hill, hill 314 and Puncio hill on Elba island in order to secure Marina di Campo beach
Anvil/Dragoon in southern France on August 14, 1944
- landing on Rayol, Cap Nègre and Canadel beaches. Neutralization of German defenses.
- Battles of Toulon and Marseille
Liberation of Belfort, combats in Alsace
In 1945 the commando is operating in Germany
The GCA had 400 KIAs during WW2.

-------------------------

Beside the Bataillon de Choc and the GCA you had also the Bataillon de France IIRC (also commandos) ... to be verified.

There were also of course French SAS, French commando-marines and the CLI.

The 178 French commando-marines (included in the British 4th Commando, formed in March 1941) took part also long before the Normandy landing like the French SAS. During D-day these French commandos (troops n°1 and n°8 of the 4th Commando) landed at Sword Beach in front of Ouistreham and the strongpoint "Riva Bella". The French Commando-marines were used later in other operations, especially in the Netherlands. At Walcheren for example, the first assault was led by the troops of the 4 Cdo with the French commando-marines. They landed in Vlissingen (uncle beach). 5 hours later the Royal Marines 41, 47, 48, a Dutch troop and a Norwegian troop landed at Westkapelle.

The CLI (corps léger d'intervention = light intervention corps) operated on the Pacific theater of operations. It included 500-700 men at the creation in 1943 (in Algeria, under the command of colonel Huard) and 1,600 men in 1945. It consists in commandos called "Gaurs". They are the French equivalent of the "Chindits" and they were active in Burma and especially in Indochina from 1944 to 1946. The CLI was integrated in the 20th Indian division and was dropped behind the Japanese lines for guerrilla actions. They lost 120 KIAs and 209 WIAs. On May 1, 1945, in India, the unit becomes the 5e RIC including an airborne battalion and a SAS battalion (airborne and amphibious operations). The SAS battalion includes the marine commandos from capitaine de corvette Pierre Ponchardier also known as "commando Ponchardier" (or "tigers' commando" by the Viet-Minh). After WW2, operation in October 1945 around Saigon against the Viet-Minh, liberation of southern Indochina. Operation in Mytho, Vinh Long, Canthö, Tra Vinh etc. In 2 months the commandos free dozens of French people, 800 Christian annamists and liberate several areas. They are directly under the command of General Leclerc.



French SAS:

On 17-27 June 1940, the "infanterie de l'air" (started its formation in 1935) is transferred in North Africa and on 25 August 1940, the units are disbanded.

The French airborne units of the free French forces were then created by General de Gaulle on 29 September 1940, under the command of Captain Georges Bergé (father of the French SAS). The first platoon was Jump certified at Christmas with the first British paratroopers in Central Landing Establishment - Ringway. In March and May 1941, two missions under the control of the SOE were completed in occupied France under the command of G.Bergé. ("Savanah" and "Josephine B").

These two missions were the first realized by allied forces in France. They have shown the ability to introduce a commando in occupied territory and exfiltrate it after the mission completed.

In June 1941, the 1st company was cut in three platoons. The first was assigned to the BCRA - the secret service of Free French - for special missions in occupied France. The two other platoons were the new 1st Air Infantry company (= CIA = Compagnie d'Infanterie de l'Air).

In July 1941, the 1st Air Infantry company went in North-Africa. After a time in Lebanon, the company becomes 1st "Compagnie de Chasseurs Parachutistes" (= CCP) and did a para training course in the Kabret Para Training Centre.

In September, Bergé who was now a great friend of David Stirling, obtained the authorization of General de Gaulle to be 3rd Squadron SPECIAL AIR SERVICE BRIGADE, because the ancestors of the famous General have fight in middle-age with the King of Scotland. The French General was along his life a great friend of Scottish. In November the 3rd Squadron - 1st CCP (Compagnie de Chasseurs Parachutistes) (50 Officers, NCOs and men) began its SAS specialized training. During this time in Great Britain a new Para Unit was created to welcome volunteers in a 2nd CIA.

From June to November 1942, a lot of missions were completed successfully by French and British SAS together on airfields and logistic bases on the coast of Lybia and Cyrenaïca. At this time the mission under the command of Bergé and Lord Jellicoe in Creta Island was completed, but unfortunately Bergé and two paras were captured, and one was killed in Heraklion. Some weeks after Stirling also failed and was captured. Along the war Bergé and Stirling were interned in the Colditz fortress in Germany.

At the end of December the 1st CCP has finished its operations in middle-east and went back in Great-Britain. At this time, a new 2nd SAS Para Company was created to operate in Tunisia with some officers and veterans of the French SAS Squad. After some successful fights, in January and February the 2nd company went also back in Great-Britain. The first page of French SAS history was written.

The French SAS received as a great award and tribute the famous SAS wings and three gold inscriptions on their battle-honor. In March 1943, the veterans of the 1st and 2nd SAS companies were totally integrated to the French forces in Great-Britain and formed the 1st and 2nd "Bataillon d'Infanterie de l'Air" (= BIA = Air Infantry Battalion).

In November a 3rd BIA was created in Lebanon and Algeria and was sent to Great-Britain. On 11 January 1944, the 1st BIA (renamed 4th BIA) and the 3rd BIA were integrated to the new SAS Brigade under the command of General Mac Leod as 4th SAS and 3rd SAS. From February to May the French SAS trained sometimes with the 1st Polish Para Brigade in Largo to prepare the landing in Europe and the operations to liberate occupied territories.

During the night of 5 June 1944, 4 sticks of 4th SAS were dropped on north and south Brittany to prepare SAS bases ("Samwest", "Dingson", "Grog"), to take contact with local Resistance and established DZ and LZ for the battalion. The mission of the French SAS was to destroy all communication lines, to prepare ambushes and sabotages in order to prevent all enemy's movements toward Normandy. These men were amongst the first allied soldiers engaged for D-Day operations with allied pathfinders units. This fact was a decision of General Montgomery. Immediately after his landing, the stick from lieutenant Marienne had to fight against German troops (Ukrainians from Vlassov's army), and corporal Bouétard was wounded and killed by a German NCO. It is often said it was the first allied soldier KIA during D-Day operation.

One night after the D-Day, 18 French SAS teams known as "Cooney parties" were dropped on all parts of Brittany to accomplish sabotages on rail roads; roads etc. in order to cut hinder all German movements towards the Normandy beachheads. At this time in Brittany about 150,000 Germans were ready to head for the Normandy landing areas. Night after night, sticks of French SAS -4th Battalion- and containers were dropped in the area of St-Marcel (Morbihan) -"Baleine DZ"- to led ambushes and sabotages and all actions were successful. They grouped also about 10,000 French resistants to fight with them. The French SAS were never more than 450 men in that area. On 18 June, in the villages of Saint-Marcel and Serent a battle was led by 200 French SAS, 4 armed jeeps and 2,500 men of the French resistance (FFI) against more than 5,000 Germans supported by 81mm mortars. Along the day, the French resisted to the attacks helped in the afternoon by CAS provided by P47s from the USAF but at night they had to leave the battle area and get back in the maquis. Today a Resistance Museum with a SAS display is located in the village of Saint-Marcel. After this combat, the SAS were strongly hunted and many retaliation acts were realized against the civilians.

During July, the French SAS accomplished many missions in order to delay the German forces. Less than 500 men were opposed to very importance enemy forces. In August, the 3rd US Army (Patton) came in Brittany. The 2nd Squadron of 3rd SAS was dropped in Brittany to reinforce 4th SAS. There were also a lot of armed jeeps landed by gliders (the single glider SAS operation of WW2). At the end of the Brittany campaign the French SAS had lost more than 65% of their men. Immediately, the SAS wings worn directly on left breast were awarded to 4th SAS renamed 2nd RCP (= Régiment de Chasseurs Parachutistes). The 3rd SAS became 3rd RCP. At the end of the Brittany campaign the French SAS had received for the first time the red beret. It is worn with the paratroop cap-badge but without the lion and the crown.

From 1942 to September 1944 the French SAS have had the black beret with the same insignia. Only on 11th November, the 2nd RCP got the red beret with the SAS winged dagger embroidered cap badge to parade in Paris on the "Champs Elysées". A few time later the 3rd RCP received also the red beret with SAS cap-badge.

In August a team of 4th SAS was the first to fight in Paris for the liberation of the city. They are the first allies to enter into Paris. From September to November 1944, many SAS operations were realized in France by the two French regiments : "spencer", "harrods", "barker", "bullbasket2", "dickens", "moses", "derry", "samson", "salesman", "marshall", "snelgrove", "jockworth", "newton" and "abel". In the same time the 1st and 2nd SAS operated successfully in central and eastern France while 5th SAS operated in Normandy and on the Belgian border.

On 4 September, in the small town of "Sennecey le Grand" took place an epic combat. 4 jeeps of 3rd RCP under the command of Lieutenant Combaud de Roquebrune attacked a strong enemy convoy. Many Germans were killed, but unfortunately, the jeeps were destroyed by tanks. Now, in Sennecey le Grand stays the Inter-allied Memorial of the SAS Brigade, as a wish of David Stirling himself. At Christmas, 2nd RCP was engaged in the battle of the Bulge during operation "Franklin". Only at the end of January 1945 the regiment went back to France. After a time of training in Great Britain, the SAS were prepared for a new mission, the last of the war.

In April 1945, the last and the most important SAS operation of WW2 ("Amherst") under command of Brigadier General M. Calvert, was completed in northern Holland by 700 men of the two French regiments (this was the biggest SAS operation of WW2). Dropped, as an arrow head for the 1st Armoured Canadian Corps, during night and with very bad meteorological conditions, the sticks landed far from planed DZ. The operation was successful. In the same time British SAS had realized operation "Keystone".

On 8 May 1945, at the end of WW2 in Europe, the two French SAS regiments were assigned to French Air Force. The flag of the French SAS presented to 4th BIA in Edimburgh on 11 May 1944, was a gift of the French-Scottish association. It was one of the most awarded allied unit during WW2. On 11 November 1944, General De Gaulle during a famous parade on Champs-Elysées in Paris added the Cross of Liberation to the flag of the French SAS. The 2nd and 3rd RCP were disbanded (September 1945) and a new 2nd RCP was created. Later a SAS half-brigade was created to fight in Indochina (1946-1948) and the 2nd RCP was disbanded in Algeria at Philippeville which was also the garrison of British 2nd SAS after the landing in North-Africa in November 1942. After the half-brigade was also disbanded in 1948, the Para-Commandos of Oversea Forces took the traditions of the French SAS.

Since 1981, 1st RPIMa (1st Parachute Marine Infantry Regiment) has the missions and the traditions of the French SAS as an airborne intelligence and special operation unit. The SAS wings of WW2 with in the middle the Chimera of Indochina are worn as a special qualification on the left breast like British SAS wings, after three missions. "Who Dares Wins" is also the motto of French SAS "Qui Ose Gagne". The missions were completed in Africa, in Middle-East, during Desert Storm, in Kosovo, Yugoslavia, on Serbian border and in Afghanistan etc.

Regards,

David

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Post by David Lehmann » 27 Oct 2007 14:45

Several photos of French commandos in southern France during Anvil-Dragoon (ECPAD and Militaria magazine).
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Post by David Lehmann » 27 Oct 2007 14:46

French commandos in Toulon:
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Post by David Lehmann » 06 Nov 2007 00:01

Hello,

I know there were rather recently several articles about them but I have none of them (sadly) since I am generally more focused on 1940... and already for that I am buying to many books :)

I am also aware of several books related to the topic
- "Bataillons de Choc et Commanods de la Ie Armée - Des Vosges à l'Allemagne 1944/1945" (Raymond Muelle)
- "Commandos d'Afrique - De l'île d'Elbe au Danube" (Patrick de Gmeline)
... and probably others

-------------

Here is Raymond Muelle's book summary found on Internet.

Introduction: De l'évolution de la pensée et du vocabulaire militaire
1. En des combats sans gloire
2. Des jours de pluie et de sang
3. Infanterie légère de choc
4. Combats pour Belfort
5. Belfort libéré
6. Les Portes de l'Alsace
7. Les Sacrifices de l'hiver
8. Batailles pour Colmar ou un temps de neige et de sang
9. Le Passage du Rhin
10. La Guerre chez l'ennemi
11. Derniers combats

# Etats signalétiques sommaires
- 1er bataillon de choc
- Commandos d'Afrique
- Commandos de France
- 2e Bataillon de choc
- 4e Bataillon de choc

# Sigles et abréviations
# Bibliographie et source
# Plans Haute-Saône (30.9 au 12.10.1944)
- Les Vosges ( 16 au 25.10.1944)
- Belfort ( 16au 25.10.1944)
- Bataille de Haute-Alsace
- Cernay - Alsace ( 15.1 au 6.2.1945)
- Bataille pour Colmar
- Passage du Rhin
- Campagne d'Allemagne (23.4 au 8.5.1945)

-----------

On the Histoire & Collections website (http://livres.histoireetcollections.com ... ars/3.html) I recently ordered 3 books offered with 50% price reduction and if you buy 2 or 3 there are no shipping cost (at least for France).

LE DEBARQUEMENT DE PROVENCE 1944 [this one also exists in ENGLISH version]
... I have not received the order yet but it might contain elements about the GCA.

in English = DRAGOON - The other invasion of France
On August 15, 1944, Operation 'Dragoon' was launched in Provence. Three American divisions sailing from Naples landed between Cavalaire and Saint-Raphaël. They were followed from Corsica, Taranto and Oran by four French divisions, who captured the cities and ports of Toulon and Marseilles after tough fighting. Then Americans and French rushed north, chasing the Germans, and liberated Lyons seventy days ahead of schedule. This adventure, with its long and meticulous planning, the incertitudes, the amphibious forces, the role played by Corsica, the German defenses, the Resistance
fighters, the commandos, the airborne troops, the convoys and the assaults on the beaches, the capture of beachheads, ports, etc., is detailed here. This highly-documented study is illustrated with 50 maps and 700 photographs, mostly unpublished.
-----------

So indeed there is a 1e Bataillon de Choc and even a 2nd and a 3rd beside the Commandos d'Afrique and the Commandos de France.

If we add that to the French SAS, the CLI, the French commando-marines it makes an interesting number of units to study on the French side for "special" forces.

Regards,

David

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Post by JamesL » 11 Nov 2007 03:13

In the photo French commando near Toulon_1.jpg what weapon is he carrying? It's huge.

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Post by David Lehmann » 11 Nov 2007 09:22

Hello,

It is a fusil mitrailleur LMG Mle1924/29 (manufacture d'armes de Châtellerault = MAC) in German service its name is leMG 116(f).

Type: Light machinegun
Total length: 1007 mm
Weight (empty): 8.93 kg
Barrel Length: 500 mm
Caliber: 7.5x54 mm
Magazine: 25 rounds magazines
Rate of fire: 600 rpm or single shot selection (practical rate of fire = 200-400 rpm)
V°: 820 m/s
Practical range: 1200m against ground targets, 600m in AA fire
Very accurate at short and medium range (up to 1200m), able to engage targets up to 2000m (max range is about 3000-3200m).

Standard LMG of the French Army in 1939-1940. It was still largely in use during the later Indochina and Algeria war.

Regards,

David

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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by daveshoup2MD » 13 Mar 2021 21:49

This may be well past the date for resurrection, but I've read various references to these units and this seems like the most obvious thread, so here goes - apologies in advance.

"Allied"-sponsored French special forces/commando/etc. type units raised in 1940-43:

A) UK - various army, marine/navy, and air force personnel, under British aegis, into what became French elements of the Allies special operations forces readied for NEPTUNE/OVERLORD, some integrated with the SOE/OSS missions to the FFI, some independent, and some for more "conventional" tasks (Kieffer's naval commandos, for example); these seem to have numbered in the hundreds (?) by the time of the invasion;

B) Med/North Africa - various contingents drawn from the Gaullist forces in 1940-42, and from the North African Army's elements in 1942-43, as well as some - the CFA, or French African Free Corps (?) - drawn from the margins of both elements, after TORCH but before the FNCL and the ANFA agreements; these seem to have numbered in the thousands (?) in 1942-43.

C) post-FNCL/ANFA/North Africa - various contingents from B (and some from A, as well), plus (initially) the unit raised in the Med for use in India/Burma along the lines of the Chindits, the CIL/Light Intervention Corps; also the Shock Troops (?) Battalion(s); the "France" and "Africa" commando groups; etc. these seem to have numbered in the thousands by the time of BRASSARD, DRAGOON, etc.

There also seems like a fair amount of overlap, but to dumb it down, does one battalion equivalent (1000 men?) in the UK and three (3000) in the MTO (including the CIL) seems reasonable?

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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by wwilson » 09 Apr 2021 09:54

There were two battalion-sized SAS-type "regiments" that operated in NW Europe and W France.

CLI had 1,700 men in July 1945.

There was a parachute infantry regiment of two (later three) battalions with the First Army in France and Germany.

First Army entered France with three battalions of commandos. This was enlarged to six battalions with FFI volunteers.

One of those FFI sourced units was the "Commando de Cluny"; strength given as 650 in September 1944 and 900 by the end of the war.

Excluding the parachute infantry regiment, I think an estimate of four to five thousand for the six commando battalions with First Army is not far off, allowing for growth during the final eight months of the war in Europe.

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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by Loïc » 09 Apr 2021 14:13

All these "commandos" units including Cluny, d'Afrique etc...were reorganized 1st january 1945 in 6 Shock Battalions in 3 Groupements
e.g. Cluny became 4e Bataillon de Choc from the 2e Groupement de Bataillons de Choc

as indicated above by David Lehmann the CLI was renamed 5e RIC given the vicinity of the British Army's Ceylon Light Infantry (CLI)

the others were Chasseurs Parachutistes Regiments : 1er RCP raised in North Africa 2e 3e RCP coming from SAS and even a forgotten 5e RCP-aborted 7e Choc was raised in Lyon in 1945 but didn't really participate in the last operations

Kieffer's Naval Commandos was the 1er BMFC Bataillon de Fusiliers-Marins Commandos

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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by daveshoup2MD » 10 Apr 2021 05:29

Loïc wrote:
09 Apr 2021 14:13
All these "commandos" units including Cluny, d'Afrique etc...were reorganized 1st january 1945 in 6 Shock Battalions in 3 Groupements
e.g. Cluny became 4e Bataillon de Choc from the 2e Groupement de Bataillons de Choc

as indicated above by David Lehmann the CLI was renamed 5e RIC given the vicinity of the British Army's Ceylon Light Infantry (CLI)

the others were Chasseurs Parachutistes Regiments : 1er RCP raised in North Africa 2e 3e RCP coming from SAS and even a forgotten 5e RCP-aborted 7e Choc was raised in Lyon in 1945 but didn't really participate in the last operations

Kieffer's Naval Commandos was the 1er BMFC Bataillon de Fusiliers-Marins Commandos
Many thanks; boiling it down to before the liberation (Corsica being the exception), does roughly 1,000 in the UK and 3,000 in the MTO by the beginning of 1944 seem reasonable?

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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by Loïc » 11 Apr 2021 02:20

Probably if the following figures are corrects before the Liberation

GCA ~700 (David Lehmann above 1200)
Bataillon de Choc 700
1er RCP (2 battalions) 1600

SAS 3e 4e BIA/2e 3e RCP ~950 together
without the Naval Commandos

CLI 500 to 700

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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by daveshoup2MD » 12 Apr 2021 00:29

Loïc wrote:
11 Apr 2021 02:20
Probably if the following figures are corrects before the Liberation

GCA ~700 (David Lehmann above 1200)
Bataillon de Choc 700
1er RCP (2 battalions) 1600

SAS 3e 4e BIA/2e 3e RCP ~950 together
without the Naval Commandos

CLI 500 to 700
Thanks; any guess on how much continuity there was between the 2-3 CFA battalions and the GCA, BdC, and/or 1er RCP?

My impression - and it's just that - is the SAS, paratroopers, commandoes, etc. in the UK were (more or less) Gaullist, the CFA battalions were "Giraudist", and the various units raised in the MTO (includng the CLI) were a mix of Gaullist, "Giraudists" and ex-Army of Africa.

Is that a reasonable, do you think?

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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by wwilson » 12 Apr 2021 09:40

any guess on how much continuity there was between the 2-3 CFA battalions and the GCA, BdC, and/or 1er RCP?
French Wikipedia ( https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corps_fra ... A9volution ) mentions
The CFA was dissolved on 9 July 1943. On July 13, 1943, the redistribution of CFA elements to other units began, notably to enable the creation of commando units, integration into the Free French Forces, or the 3rd Algerian Infantry Division.

Elements of the CFA formed the African Commando Group, which was attached to the 3rd Algerian Infantry Division, commanded by General de Monsabert. A detachment of 600 men from the CFA was used to form the GCA while the 7th Company of the 2nd Battalion joined the "Chad" Provisional Regiment of the 2nd Armored Division.
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Re: Commandos d'Afrique and Commandos de Choc

Post by daveshoup2MD » 13 Apr 2021 06:41

wwilson wrote:
12 Apr 2021 09:40
any guess on how much continuity there was between the 2-3 CFA battalions and the GCA, BdC, and/or 1er RCP?
French Wikipedia ( https://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corps_fra ... A9volution ) mentions
The CFA was dissolved on 9 July 1943. On July 13, 1943, the redistribution of CFA elements to other units began, notably to enable the creation of commando units, integration into the Free French Forces, or the 3rd Algerian Infantry Division.

Elements of the CFA formed the African Commando Group, which was attached to the 3rd Algerian Infantry Division, commanded by General de Monsabert. A detachment of 600 men from the CFA was used to form the GCA while the 7th Company of the 2nd Battalion joined the "Chad" Provisional Regiment of the 2nd Armored Division.
Cheers
Merci.

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