Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Discussions on the propaganda, architecture and culture in the Third Reich.
GregSingh
Member
Posts: 3699
Joined: 21 Jun 2012 01:11
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by GregSingh » 14 Apr 2020 01:56

A visitor to the site (in 1935) wrote:
There is a separate building, with a large electric wall map, which took five years to complete.
Every three thousand Germans are marked with white, every three thousand of Russians with a red lamp. Behind the map is a complex important machinery and a network of sixty kilometers of electric cable.

With the twist of the switch, machinery begins to operate. Large electric clock, located in the upper left corner of the map, shows August 27, when it all started. Wall map illuminates with red and white lights. The red ones are everywhere, white lights mostly somewhere far west.

The clock's hand moves. Hours and days are passing. Evenly the lights are on and the new lights are going out.
The guide then explained to me that thousands of bulbs were used for this map. They all cannot be seen from the room. Only those that are glowing are visible. In front of us there are long rows of first, second and third lines of troops and reserves. In a closed cauldron, 40 km in diameter, the remains of three Russian Corps swarm in a pre-death shakes.

These light lines twist in paroxysms of struggle, they embrace all-round tentacles and die, go out ... They are formations, who were killed or taken prisoner. Fewer and fewer red lights. Getting faint.
Forty thousand Russians have fallen.
Ninety-two thousand were taken prisoners.
Twelve thousand fell on the German side.

At four o'clock in the morning on August 31, 1914, the last light goes out, somewhere near Wielbark. This is beaten Samsonow, breaking through the thick forest with a group of several officers, without stab, no orderly, no escort - shoots himself in the head. Commander of XV, commander of the XIII corps - in captivity!
In captivity 13 generals.
The End.
Melchior Wańkowicz - "Na tropach Smętka", 1936
You can get pretty damn far in life by just saying what you're going to do and then doing it.

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 18 Apr 2020 10:12

Interesting GregSingh, didn't know that!
Thanks for posting.

Maurice

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 18 Apr 2020 10:24

Br.James,

Yes, there were several stained glass windows, the one in the postcard at the flagtower. Here another example in the 'Weihehalle'.

Kind regards,

Maurice
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

Br. James
Member
Posts: 791
Joined: 27 May 2013 20:45
Location: Baltimore

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Br. James » 18 Apr 2020 15:51

Thanks very much, Maurice...the loss of the Tannenberg Memorial is quite a loss to history...

Br. James

GregSingh
Member
Posts: 3699
Joined: 21 Jun 2012 01:11
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by GregSingh » 19 Apr 2020 06:40

Note the difference in layout between early 1930's and 1940's. Main road (in blue) is missing and the entry road extended to a new road.
Also the location of Neue Tannenbergkrug (yellow arrow).

I personally like the early setup better. Not sure what they were trying to achieve, perhaps idea was to remove easy car/coach access and force visitors to walk (pilgrimage) all the way from the hotel to the memorial.

TD1935.jpg
TD1942.jpg

And here how it looked on maps from different periods. A new main road was built further north, away from the memorial.
(Click on maps to load them in full resolution).

1.jpg
2.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
You can get pretty damn far in life by just saying what you're going to do and then doing it.

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 19 Apr 2020 13:20

Quite amazing to see that people from all over the world being busy with a disappeared German monument in Prussia :D Thanks to this forum!

Br. James, yes, a loss indeed, although I wonder what would have happend if the Germans didn't blew it up themselves. Perhaps the Russians or Poles would have done the same.

Gregsingh, nice work, hadn't realized the changes! Thanks for the maps as well.

Kind regards,

Maurice

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 19 Apr 2020 13:23

I believe this photo was not in this thread before. statue of Hindenburg. Makes me wonder if the sculpure survived somehow?
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

ljadw
Member
Posts: 13608
Joined: 13 Jul 2009 17:50

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by ljadw » 19 Apr 2020 16:28

The sculpture was evacuated in January 1945,when East Prussia was invaded by the Soviets .

GregSingh
Member
Posts: 3699
Joined: 21 Jun 2012 01:11
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by GregSingh » 21 Apr 2020 09:41

Photo we wouldn't see on a postcard.
Wartime aerial view and in the top right corner - POW camp - Stalag I-B Hohenstein !!!

Stalag I-B.jpg

And a view of Stalag I-B POW camp, we can see Tannenberg Memorial on the horizon.

Stalag-I-B 2.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
You can get pretty damn far in life by just saying what you're going to do and then doing it.

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 01 May 2020 07:25

ljadw wrote:
19 Apr 2020 16:28
The sculpture was evacuated in January 1945,when East Prussia was invaded by the Soviets .
Is it known where it currently is?

Kind regards,

Maurice

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 01 May 2020 07:30

For my German friend, who is a guide at the Olympic village near Berlin; Does anybody know which artists made the sculptures shown in this picture, placed in the Feldherrenturm of the monument?

Thanks in advance!

Maurice
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

ljadw
Member
Posts: 13608
Joined: 13 Jul 2009 17:50

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by ljadw » 01 May 2020 07:41

Maurice Laarman wrote:
01 May 2020 07:25
ljadw wrote:
19 Apr 2020 16:28
The sculpture was evacuated in January 1945,when East Prussia was invaded by the Soviets .
Is it known where it currently is?

Kind regards,

Maurice
In 1946 the Americans ordered to move the sarcophages of Hindenburg and his wife to the Elizabeth Church in Marburg where they are still buried ,as far as I know .

GregSingh
Member
Posts: 3699
Joined: 21 Jun 2012 01:11
Location: Melbourne, Australia

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by GregSingh » 01 May 2020 08:40

Are we sure the Hindenburgstandbild survived the demolition in January 1945? I think only sarcophages were evacuated, not the statue.
I'm pretty sure I've seen post war photo of the destroyed statue.
You can get pretty damn far in life by just saying what you're going to do and then doing it.

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 01 May 2020 14:09

ljadw wrote:
01 May 2020 07:41
Maurice Laarman wrote:
01 May 2020 07:25
ljadw wrote:
19 Apr 2020 16:28
The sculpture was evacuated in January 1945,when East Prussia was invaded by the Soviets .
Is it known where it currently is?

Kind regards,

Maurice
In 1946 the Americans ordered to move the sarcophages of Hindenburg and his wife to the Elizabeth Church in Marburg where they are still buried ,as far as I know .
That is true, but the statue was as far as I know not part of that transport.

User avatar
Maurice Laarman
Member
Posts: 426
Joined: 10 Apr 2007 16:10
Location: Rotterdam

Re: Is This the Tannenberg Memorial?

Post by Maurice Laarman » 01 May 2020 14:12

Something more of the evacuation:

http://www.webarchiv-server.de/pin/arch ... 03ob36.htm

Hindenburgs letzte Fahrt
Die Evakuierung aus dem Tannenberg-Denkmal
von Kristian Knaack

Am 25. Januar 1945 meldete die 229. Infanteriedivision an das VII. Panzer-Korps, daß in den Mittagsstunden des 21. Januar alle Maßnahmen zur Vernichtung des Reichsehrenmals eingeleitet worden seien. Zur Sprengung kam es aber tatsächlich erst in den Abendstunden des 21. Januar. Die vorhandenen Sprengmittel reichten lediglich für die Zerstörung der Hindenburg-Gruft sowie des Haupt- und Eingangsturms. Dies geht aus einer äußerst akkurat recherchierten Dokumentation von Gert Sailer hervor, die 1988 im Deutschen Soldatenjahrbuch erschien.
Die Initiative zur Bergung der Hindenburg-Särge ging - so Gert Sailer - auch vom Königsberger Festungskommandanten und Wehrkreisbefehlshaber General der Infanterie Otto Lasch aus, doch ganz besonders von Laschs Chef des Stabes, Oberst im Generalstab Frhr. v. Süsskind-Schwendi. Hitler soll das Ersuchen zunächst abgelehnt haben. Wenig später sei jedoch durch Führerbefehl die Bergung der Särge wie die Zerstörung des Tannenberg-Denkmals angeordnet worden. Am 20. Januar wurden noch ohne jeden unmittelbaren Feinddruck die Gebeine des Ehepaares v. Hindenburg zusammen mit den Nachbildungen der an der Schlacht beteiligten Fahnen und Standarten nach Königsberg in vorläufige Sicherheit gebracht. Wer am 20. Januar Särge abtransportierte und auf welche Weise, sagt Sailer leider nicht.
Aber in seiner mit wissenschaftlicher Akribie erstellten Dokumentation sind dennoch weitere, wesentliche Informationen enthalten wie beispielsweise, daß die 229. Infanteriedivision erst in der Nacht vom 20. auf den 21. Januar ihren neuen Gefechtsstand - von Osten kommend - in Hohenstein im Hotel "Kaiserhof" einrichtete, wo am Morgen des 21. per Funk vom VII. Panzer-Korps der Führerbefehl zur Zerstörung des Tannenberg-Denkmals entgegengenommen wurde. Hieraus ergibt sich, daß die 229. Infanteriedivision zwar mit der Sprengung des Denkmals, nicht jedoch mit der Bergung der Särge beauftragt wurde, und weiterhin, daß der Zerstörungsbefehl erst gegeben wurde, nachdem die erfolgreiche Bergung aus dem Tannenberg-Denkmal durchgeführt worden war. Noch wichtiger ist ein weiterer Hinweis von Gert Sailer. Kurz vor der Sprengung, da völlige Ruhe herrschte, konnte ein Wehrmachtssoldat noch einmal ausführlich das Tannenberg-Denkmal inspizieren. Alle Türme seien ausgeräumt und leer gewesen. "Auch in der Hindenburg-Gruft sah er sich um, die beiden Sarkophage waren nicht mehr da."
Auf dem Kreuzer "Emden" in Königsberg aber kamen die beiden Bronze-Sarkophage aus der Hindenburg-Gruft nicht mehr an, sondern nur noch die beiden Eichen-Särge der Eheleute v. Hindenburg und die 69 Tannenberg-Feldzeichen. Von den Bronze-Sarkophagen fehlte jede Spur. Auch die weiteren Ausstattungsstücke der acht Türme, die vorher - so Gert Sailer - von dem Denkmalshauptmann Fritz Stubenrauch abtransportiert worden seien, sind verschollen.
Aus den zahlreichen Zuschriften auf die Veröffentlichung "Die Spuren der Särge" in der Folge 8 vom 22. Februar läßt sich bereits jetzt eine überraschende Erkenntnis gewinnen: der Abtransport der Hindenburg-Särge aus dem Tannenberg-Denkmal erfolgte nicht am 20., sondern erst am Morgen des 21. Januars. Dem Transport, bestehend aus vier bis fünf Lastkraftwagen, wohnte eine Hohensteinerin aus Mohrungen bei. Ob es sich dabei um die Särge oder die bronzenen Sarkophage gehandelt habe, ist ihr nicht mehr erinnerlich. "Fahnen wurden jedenfalls im Tannenberg-Denkmal nicht mitaufgeladen."
Ein anderer Zeitzeuge erinnert sich, die Lastwagen-Kolonne auf dem Kasernengelände in Allenstein, Nähe Haupttor/Wache, abends am 21. Januar gesehen zu haben. Es hieß: "Hier sind die Särge von Hindenburg und seiner Frau drauf, aus Tannenberg geholt." Allenstein liegt südöstlich von Mohrungen. Aber auch in Heilsberg wurde zu einem unbekannten Zeitpunkt von einer dort lebenden Königsbergerin ein einzelner "überdeckter Transporter" gesehen, auf dem - nach Auskunft eines Offiziers - die Hindenburgs Ostpreußen verlassen würden. Der Lastkraftwagen kam aus Richtung Allenstein und fuhr Richtung Bartenstein weiter. Doch auch im nördlich von Allenstein gelegenen Landsberg wurden am 21. oder 22. Januar 1945 zwei Militärfahrzeuge mit den Hindenburg-Särgen und aufgerollten Fahnen gesehen. Sie parkten vor dem Hotel "Landsberger Hof". Ein Pionier-Hauptmann unbekannten Namens berichtete gesprächsweise einem Ostpreußen während einer Busfahrt, daß er den Sonderauftrag gehabt habe, das Tannenberg-Denkmal zu sprengen und die Särge nach Königsberg auf die "Emden" zu bringen. So kann es wohl nicht ganz gewesen sein. Interessant ist dennoch seine Behauptung, der Transport sei zunächst mit der Bahn erfolgt, habe dann aber später mit Lastkraftwagen fortgesetzt werden müssen.
Warum der so sorgfältige Rechercheur Gert Sailer eine zunächst plausibel erscheinende Version nicht publiziert hat, läßt sich heute nicht mehr überprüfen. Sein Nachlaß ist - bis auf ein kleines, schwarzes Notizbuch - nicht erhalten geblieben. Demnach will Hauptmann D. R. Estner, im Zivilberuf Lehrer in Hohenstein, die Särge - nicht etwa Sarkophage - abtransportiert haben. Estner war jedoch in Königsberg stationiert. Wie er bei der zeitlich engen Befehlsgebung so schnell nach Hohenstein gelangt sein könnte, läßt sich nicht erklären. Der Hauptmann gilt seit den Kämpfen im Heiligenbeiler Kessel als vermißt. Den Särge-Transport erwähnte er in einem Brief an seine Frau.
Eine ernsthafte Spur, daß der Transport der Hindenburg-Särge per Eisenbahn, wenn auch nur teilweise, erfolgte, ist den bis jetzt vorliegenden Zuschriften zwar nicht zu entnehmen, aber dennoch eine Reihe von höchstinteressanten "Widersprüchlichkeiten", in der Forschung als "konkurrierende Informationen" bezeichnet. Demnach kann belegt werden, daß die Eisenbahnstrecke zwischen Bartenstein und Königsberg - und damit über Glommen - noch bis zum 26. Januar intakt war. Die "konkurrierenden Hinweise" lassen es als denkbar erscheinen, daß Särge und Sarkophage getrennt Richtung Königsberg verbracht wurden und einer dieser Transporte per Eisenbahn um den 21./22. Januar 1945 über den Haltepunkt Glommen verlief.
Ein vorliegender Hinweis auf "Verladetätigkeit" am Haltepunkt Glommen, der in Zusammenhang mit dem Transport der Sär-
ge/Sarkophage stehen könnte, war Anlaß zu einer Untersuchung des ersten Transport-Abschnittes der "letzten Reise der von Hindenburgs" mit dem überraschenden Ergebnis, daß die bisher in der Historiographie gemachten Angaben einer wissen-
schaftlichen Überprüfung nicht standhielten. Auch wenn es eigentlich zehn, 20 Jahre zu spät ist, so berechtigen doch die so zahlreichen wie wertvollen Zuschriften der Leser der Preußischen Allgemeinen zur obengenannten Thematik zur Hoffnung, daß dieses von der Geschichtsforschung bisher negierte Thema von nationaler Bedeutung, "Der lange letzte Weg der Hindenburg-Särge" vom Reichsehrenmal Tannenberg bis zur Elisabeth-Kirche in Marburg, doch noch umfassend und der Wirklichkeit entsprechend aufgearbeitet werden kann.
"Paul steh' auf, wir brauchen Dich!" kam es einem älteren Herrn über die Lippen, neben einem Matrosen der "Emden" stehend, als er die im Schneetreiben daliegenden Särge und Fahnen sah. Der Anblick war so erbarmungswürdig wie die Situation in Ostpreußen. Das war nicht der Ort und die Zeit für kritische Fragen.
Warum wurde die so kostbare "Fracht" nicht gleich in den schützenden Bauch der "Pretoria" im nur 34 Kilometer entfernten Pillau verbracht, von den "mehreren Lastwagen", wo doch nur einer - wie der Transportabschnitt Potsdam-Bernterode zeigt - vonnöten war? Warum wurden die Särge mit Ehrenwache so deutlich auf der "Emden" zur Schau gestellt, wo doch die "Emden" zu diesem Zeitpunkt ein Schrotthaufen war und niemand wußte, wann - und ob überhaupt - die "Emden" wieder fahrbereit gemacht werden könnte? Warum keine schützenden Planen über Särgen und Fahnen, dafür aber über dem Sarg des Generalfeldmarschalls die wie ein Signal wirkende alte deutsche Reichskriegsflagge Schwarz-Weiß-Rot mit Eisernem Kreuz (das Walter Görlitz in seiner 1953 erschienenen Hindenburg-Biographie noch wegretuschierte)? Warum hat kein Historiker bisher die Frage gestellt, was denn dem Sarg Paul v. Hindenburgs unterwegs widerfahren sein möge, daß er im Bergwerk Bernterode wieder grob mit Nägeln zusammengezimmert werden mußte? Nicht nur der erste Transport-Abschnitt "Tannenberg-Denkmal - Königsberg" ist voller ungeklärter Fragen, die Anspruch auf seriöse, richtige, der damaligen Wirklichkeit entsprechende Antworten haben - über fünf Jahrzehnte danach.

Return to “Propaganda, Culture & Architecture”