"Desert-Worthy"

Discussions on WW2 in Africa & the Mediterranean. Hosted by Andy H
User avatar
White Leopard
Member
Posts: 1128
Joined: 13 Jul 2002 02:50
Location: United States

"Desert-Worthy"

Post by White Leopard » 19 Oct 2004 17:36

Having read some stories about the difficulty that U.S. soldiers are encountering with the climate and supply situations in Iraq, I would like to know if anyone can tell about ways that the Afrika Corps delt with similar problems during the North African campaigns. Can anyone supply information and/or examples?

User avatar
David W
Member
Posts: 3494
Joined: 28 Mar 2004 01:30
Location: Devon, England

Post by David W » 19 Oct 2004 23:11

Hello White Leopard.

There exists on the internet a very detailed article which will tell you all you need to know. The trouble is, although I have read it, I didn't save it.
I am sure however, that someone reading this post will be able to provide you with a link straight to it. Needless to say if I find it again I will let you know.

Cheers Dave.

User avatar
maxxx
Member
Posts: 1743
Joined: 29 Apr 2004 18:14
Location: austria

Post by maxxx » 23 Oct 2004 20:20

i remember my father telling me he had a "Wüstentauglichkeit" (fit for desert duty). But than he had to go to russia.....

User avatar
Michael Emrys
Member
Posts: 6002
Joined: 13 Jan 2005 18:44
Location: USA

Post by Michael Emrys » 15 Jan 2005 22:47

The Brits seem to have tried to give all new troops a month or two to adapt to living and fighting in desert conditions whenever possible before committing them to combat. I'm uncertain to what extent the Axis followed the same procedure, but it seems as if German troops often got sent to the front as soon as they stepped off the boat.

It's worth noting that equipment also had to be made "desert worthy", especially the armor and aircraft. As near as I have been able to find out, for the Germans, apparently most of that kind of work was done before the materiel left Europe. In the case of the Brits, most of it seems to have been done in workshops in Egypt.

Return to “WW2 in Africa & the Mediterranean”