"Germania"?

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Oderint Dvm Metvant
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"Germania"?

Post by Oderint Dvm Metvant » 29 May 2003 02:11

Maybe someone more well versed in language could aid me on this one - I constantly see references here and in various books with the Hitler/Speer rebuilding of Berlin as "Germania", but how exactly could native German speakers name a city "Germania" when the world "German" does not exist in the German language?
Would it not be something like "Deutschia"? ;-) hehe

Karl
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Post by Karl » 29 May 2003 02:40

Germania is a very German word, IIRC.

Here is more info on the topic covered by the very capable Thorfinn:

http://www.thirdreichforum.com/viewtopic.php?t=8827

Regards.

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Oderint Dvm Metvant
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Post by Oderint Dvm Metvant » 29 May 2003 02:42

xxxx
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Post by Karl » 29 May 2003 02:46

It's like a name.

A proper noun.

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Oderint Dvm Metvant
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Post by Oderint Dvm Metvant » 29 May 2003 03:18

xxxx
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Post by Karl » 29 May 2003 03:21

I don’t know the extent of the history of the word but I don’t think it was imported as such.

Here, try to say it: GEHR-MEH-NEE-AH

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Oderint Dvm Metvant
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Post by Oderint Dvm Metvant » 29 May 2003 03:23

Thank you but I am aware of how to pronounce words.

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Post by Karl » 29 May 2003 03:24

Well ok then. Doesn't it sound very German to you?

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Oderint Dvm Metvant
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Post by Oderint Dvm Metvant » 29 May 2003 04:10

xxxx
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Post by Oderint Dvm Metvant » 29 May 2003 04:11

xxxx
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Karl
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Post by Karl » 29 May 2003 04:12

Why don’t you read this thread over again. Carefully and slowly this time.

Maybe I am wrong, I’ll leave it up to another native speaker to confirm or to correct.

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Post by Oderint Dvm Metvant » 29 May 2003 04:44

xxxx
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Karl
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Post by Karl » 29 May 2003 04:45

Eh?

I was trying to help you man.

Nevermind.

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Marcus
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Post by Marcus » 29 May 2003 10:06

Oderint Dvm Metvant,

I see no reason to delete it, so cool it.

/Marcus

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Re: "Germania"?

Post by Phaethon » 29 May 2003 11:13

Oderint Dvm Metvant wrote:...but how exactly could native German speakers name a city "Germania" when the world "German" does not exist in the German language?
You are right insofar as the noun German comes from the Latin word Germanus which was used to designate the various peoples of Northern and central Europe. Germanus itself probably stems from the Celtish word gair for neighbour. Thus the Romans, who occupied primarily Celtic regions of Europe picked up the name for peoples in the unconquered regions. Since then, in English in particular, German has come to mean just the citixens of the modern nation of Germany, although many other nationalities can be described as Germanic in the original Latin sense.

Why would Hitler therefore choose an esstentially foreign word to describe his captital? Well, to start with Latin is a dead but scholarly language which, with Germans as well as most other western cultures, carries a great deal of kudos through its long association with scholastic disciplines. Essentially, to employ Latin can be interpreted as pretension. More technically, Germania is an ideal name for what Hitler envisioned as a capital for the unified Germanic nations of central Europe and Scandinavia.

Cheers,

K.
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Ken Cocker, London

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