Best Allied PTO strategy?

Discussions on WW2 in the Pacific and the Sino-Japanese War.
daveshoup2MD
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Re: Best Allied PTO strategy?

Post by daveshoup2MD » 14 Jun 2020 07:03

Japan is an archipelago, utterly dependent on the sea lanes. The only significant source of POL for Japan's war effort were the occupied NEI.

The US west coast is the departure point for all significant Allied combat power in the Pacific.

The Alaska-Hawaii-Panama triangle was secure by Q1, 1942. The US-SWPA supply lines were secure by Q2, 1942.

The shortest route from the US West Coast to the Western Pacific (where the sea lanes from the NEI to Japan were ) was via the Central Pacific.

QED - the Central Pacific offensive from Hawaii west through MIcronesia to the Philippines was the best strategy to get US forces to the point where the Western Pacific sea lanes could be interdicted; once that was underway, Micronesia and the PI provide the best bases for advances north toward Japan proper.

The South Pacific and Southwest Pacific campaigns were complimentary to the Central Pacific offensive at best, useless sideshows at worst.

Carl Schwamberger
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Re: Best Allied PTO strategy?

Post by Carl Schwamberger » 22 Jun 2020 02:07

daveshoup2MD wrote:
14 Jun 2020 07:03
... The South Pacific and Southwest Pacific campaigns were complimentary to the Central Pacific offensive at best, useless sideshows at worst.
The fighting in the Solomons attritioned the IJN air strength & was a useful diversion into 1943. In that sense those battles fit War Plan ORANGE, the Pacific portion of the RAINBOW Plans, or WPP-46. Once the fleet is built up enough to launch the Central Pacific offensive in autumn 1943 there not much point to a S Pacific offensive, other than diversion & air or naval interdiction of oil shipment.

ChristopherPerrien
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or could havebeen Re: Best Allied PTO strategy?

Post by ChristopherPerrien » 27 Jun 2020 05:16

Carl Schwamberger wrote:
09 Jun 2020 18:33
So far this discussion has moved along without consideration of logistics. Specifically the cost in precious cargo ships. Comparing the days per ton delivered a cargo ship is tied up suggests the SPac offensive is a undesireable option.
Oh yea, it does, LOL.

It becomes a question if all of Macathurs offensives and an interest in the SWPAC and in the retaking of the Phillipines, was ntohing more more than a sideshow to entertain a political opponent of Franklin Roosevelt versus a sound strategic strategy. A central pacific thrust (per Ellis) vs the strategy of a retired gone native/glory seeker per Macarthur. Really a great topic that never will be researched in any depth as it could have been when WWII was of any interest outside of the nerds/geeks/old fools such as we have here, LOL .

Or did,,, 20 years ago:( And it is a shame.

stulev
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Re: Best Allied PTO strategy?

Post by stulev » 27 Jun 2020 12:59

The destruction of most of the Imperial Japanese Navy took place in the SWP and Philippines theaters of operations

Carl Schwamberger
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Re: Best Allied PTO strategy?

Post by Carl Schwamberger » 28 Jun 2020 17:54

stulev wrote:
27 Jun 2020 12:59
The destruction of most of the Imperial Japanese Navy took place in the SWP and Philippines theaters of operations
A important point. Much of that destruction occured while the Japanese were still attempting the strategic offensive in 1942. Something the US has no control over.

The question comes to how much, or little, the US can send in 1943 & 1944.Would lower cost holding actions and diversions be more efficient?

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