Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

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henryk
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Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by henryk » 08 Jul 2021 20:10

https://notesfrompoland.com/2021/07/07/ ... e-rebuilt/
See source for pictures
Warsaw palace destroyed in WWII to be rebuilt
JUL 7, 2021

President Andrzej Duda has submitted a plan to reconstruct the historic Saxon Palace (Pałac Saski) in central Warsaw, which was destroyed by the German occupiers during World War Two. The idea has received support from the prime minister, who has called for cross-party collaboration on the project. Duda today presented the speaker of parliament, Elżbieta Witek, with a presidential bill to rebuild the Saxon Palace, as well as the nearby Brühl Palace (also destroyed in the war) and tenement houses along Królewska Street in Warsaw. The ceremony took place on the city’s Piłsudski Square, where a small part of the Saxon Palace remains at its former location, housing the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier.

The Saxon Palace, first built in 1666 and then remodelled in 1842, served as the seat of the General Staff of the Polish Armed Forces after World War One. Most of the palace was blown up by the German army after the 1944 Warsaw Uprising. The neighbouring Brühl Palace was completed in 1642 as a residential building. The rococo palace housed Poland’s foreign ministry before World War Two, and was also destroyed by the Germans in 1944.

The square on which the two palaces sat also previously hosted the 70-metre-tall Alexander Nevsky Cathedral, a Russian Orthodox church completed in 1912 when Warsaw was still part of the Russian Empire. It was demolished just over a decade later by the authorities in newly independent Poland.

The square remains one of Warsaw’s largest, and now serves as a site for important state visits and ceremonies, including an open-air mass by Pope John Paul II a year after ascending to the papacy. The area also hosts a number of monuments, including one marking the Smolensk air disaster of 2010. The idea of rebuilding the palace came about in 2018, on the 100th anniversary of Poland regaining independence. On 11 November, Independence Day, Duda signed a declaration on restoring the palace as a historical monument. Under the plan presented today, the Saxon and Brühl palaces would become seats for public institutions, including potentially the Senate, the upper house of parliament. But they would also be open to the public.

“The Saxon Palace is…inscribed in the memory of prewar Warsaw,” said presidential minister Wojciech Kolarski. It “symbolised the Second Polish Republic”, he added, referring to the the interwar Polish state established in 1918 and which existed until the German invasion of 1939. He said that reconstruction would serve as “testimony to the continuity of our history” as well as “an expression of the construction of a modern Republic of Poland”. Public debate about the reconstruction of the sites around the Saxon Palace has been underway since the 1940s. According to Kolarski, these efforts were torpedoed by Poland’s communist authorities because the buildings symbolised the institutions of the independent interwar Polish state.

In 2012 a foundation, Saski 2018, was established to campaign for the rebuilding of the western face of the palace. Reconstruction was also floated by the government as part of the recently unveiled “Polish Deal” economic stimulus package. “We want to develop Polish museums. We will expand castles and palaces, the Saxon Palace,” said Jarosław Kaczyński, chairman of the ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party, while announcing the package. The idea has, however, been met with scepticism from the opposition. In 2019, Warsaw’s mayor Rafał Trzaskowski, now deputy leader of the Civic Platform (PO) party, told Rzeczpospolita that rebuilding the palace was “not the most urgent investment in Warsaw” and could “disturb the urban space”.

At today’s ceremony, however, Duda expressed hope that the rebuilding of the palace could be an “investment beyond all political divisions”, reports Polsat News. Speaking alongside him, Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki likewise called for “cross-party collaboration that will unite all Poles”. He said that the rebuilt Saxon Palace could “become the beating heart of the reborn Third Republic of Poland, a story about the Polish soul – let’s write this story together.”

During his speech, Morawiecki called the destruction of the palaces – as well as much of the rest of Warsaw – “a planned act of savage barbarism carried out by the Germans” to take “revenge against Warsaw” for the uprising.

Maria Wilczek is deputy editor of Notes from Poland. She is a regular writer for The Times, The Economist and Al Jazeera English, and has also featured in Foreign Policy, Politico Europe, The Spectator and Gazeta Wyborcza.

gebhk
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Re: Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by gebhk » 15 Jul 2021 08:33

Hi Henryk

Do you have a feel for how this plan is being received in Poland? Do people (ie the taxpayers who, presumably, will be paying for this) think this should be done or is the general feeling, that their money could be better spent elsewhere?

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Re: Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by henryk » 15 Jul 2021 19:49

gebhk wrote:
15 Jul 2021 08:33
Hi Henryk

Do you have a feel for how this plan is being received in Poland? Do people (ie the taxpayers who, presumably, will be paying for this) think this should be done or is the general feeling, that their money could be better spent elsewhere?
No, my living in Canada, and with reduced contact with relatives does not give me a view.

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Re: Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by crolick » 16 Jul 2021 11:34

gebhk wrote:
15 Jul 2021 08:33
Hi Henryk

Do you have a feel for how this plan is being received in Poland? Do people (ie the taxpayers who, presumably, will be paying for this) think this should be done or is the general feeling, that their money could be better spent elsewhere?
Poland is deeply divided now and no surprise the topic of Palac Saski is no different.

So part of the society supporting government is in favor, the opposition is raising too high cost etc.

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Re: Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by GregSingh » 17 Jul 2021 10:13

Poland is deeply divided
Every country seems to be deeply divided these days.
When you rebuild objects of historical significance, money is not an issue. Eg. what's the point of rebuilding a cathedral in Kaliningrad (with less that 5% of Catholics and no Germans left) ? It's just a beautiful historical building.

Also Poland can "print" it as it has its own currency and it does not need to come from taxation.
Overheard in the office:
Instead of losing 10% a year to inflation, you can invest in the stock market and lose 80% a year to stupidity.

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Re: Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by gebhk » 05 Aug 2021 10:21

Hi Greg and Crolick

You can print more money, though not without some impact on the economy however you must agree that resources are ultimately limited. Therefore the debate whether those resources should be used to build a new municipal building or a hospital, school or battleship is a sensible one. I agree with you that Poland has divided opinions on everything - like every other country that is allowed to air them and I believe that is a healthy thing (it is those countries that on the surface show slavish unity that are dangerous both to themselves and everyone else). In a representative democracy, it is the job of the opposition to hold up every idea of the government to scrutiny and therefore there will be automatic gainsaying of any government project which will be reflected in the press depending on which side individual press organisations support - again a healthy situation. However, that does not necessarily reflect the views of the majority of the population and hence my question.

Incidentally, I would also suggest that even from a purely historical perspective this is not a straightforward question. Even with the best scholarship and good will, we will not be getting a historical building but a 1:1 scale model. It is not at all the same as the real thing: for example will it be a model of the building as it was in 1670, 1730, 1750, 1850 or 1920? The fact is that the 'historical' palace is what we see today - for that was the hand dealt it by history, admittedly a harsh one but one that bears witness, in a very real way, to that history. Furthermore, by building on the same site we may well be obliterating crucial surviving historical evidence, denying future researchers vital clues.

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Re: Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by GregSingh » 23 Jun 2022 05:22

Looks like rebuilding has not started yet (as of May 2022).
Although we can see different kind of activity at the site. :D

Saxon.jpg
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Re: Historic Saxon Palace to be Rebuilt

Post by henryk » 19 Aug 2022 19:53

https://www.polskieradio.pl/395/7784/Ar ... -officials
Poland begins work to rebuild historic Saxon Palace: officials
Polish Radio 19.08.2022 13:30

Poland's government has announced the start of work to rebuild the historic Saxon Palace, a massive project in Warsaw that is expected to be completed in 2030 at a cost of some PLN 2.5 billion (EUR 530 million). The palace, which was destroyed by the Germans in 1944, has been described as “one of Poland’s most majestic buildings before the Second World War."

Deputy Culture and National Heritage Minister Jarosław Sellin told public broadcaster Polish Radio on Friday that the reconstruc"The project is expensive, but many Polish companies and employees will benefit from it," Sellin said. He added that the reconstruction of the Saxon Palace was part of efforts to rebuild the Polish capital from the ruins of World War II. "It's a matter of national dignity and honour," Sellin told Polish Radio.tion effort was one of the most ambitious investment projects undertaken by his country's conservative government since it came into power in 2015.

In the early 19th century, the Saxon Palace housed a high school in which Romantic composer Frederic Chopin’s father taught French, living with his family on the palace premises. Following World War I, the Saxon Palace served as the headquarters of the Polish General Staff.

From 1930 to 1937, the building was used by the Polish Armed Forces Cipher Office, and it was there that the German Enigma machine codes were first cracked in 1932 by three Polish mathematicians, Marian Rejewski, Jerzy Różycki and Henryk Żygalski, according to a report last year by the Jerusalem Post. The Israeli daily reported at the time that they “created a copy of the German Enigma machine, known as the Polish Enigma, and … in the summer of 1939, at a meeting of French and British cryptologists near Warsaw, they … passed on two of their Enigma machine replicas, one to the British and one to the French.” This laid the foundations for the wartime code-breaking carried out by Britain and their allies, the Jerusalem Post noted.

After suppressing the 1944 Warsaw Uprising, the Germans blew up the palace as part of their planned destruction of Warsaw.

Polish President Andrzej Duda last year submitted a bill to parliament on the rebuilding of the Saxon Palace as a symbolic completion of the city’s reconstruction from the ruins of World War II. At a ceremony last summer, Duda told high-ranking officials gathered at Warsaw's Piłsudski Square, where the Saxon Palace stood until 1944, that the site, alongside the Royal Castle, was one of the architectural symbols of the Polish capital.

The only section of the Saxon Palace which has survived to this day is the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, part of Warsaw's central Piłsudski Square.

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